Changes to US Betting Law and an Exciting Future for Gaming?

Earlier this month the Supreme Court made a decision that is likely to have an immense impact on gambling in the USA by ruling to strike down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act. What this decision means in practice is that it will no longer be necessary to go to Nevada in order to legally bet on a sports game.

The decision was made as part of a case from the state of New Jersey, which was desirous of change so that betting could take place legitimately within its boundaries.  The central idea here was that when Congress actually passed the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act back in 1992, it was overstepping the mark and in fact exceeding its authority.

Following this result, it seems likely that within a period of around five years as many as 32 states will have set up sports betting facilities of one kind or another.

Apart from economic and moral shifts, it’s interesting to consider the cultural changes that this decision will bring to American society as a whole. Once sports betting becomes more accessible, it will soon start to be considered more normal and less special or extreme. This is just how the human psyche works: we are highly responsive to our environment and quick to adapt to changes of all kinds. The outlook of the average man or woman is likely to change and the attitude to gambling in general will also alter.

This may in turn pave the way for other forms of gambling and create a pressure to legalize casino gambling. The online gaming market could also be opened up in America, with the competition to be the top online casino creating a higher quality experience for players the world over and increasing the demand for guiding services such as Casino Slots Guru.

Of course, whilst many will be disturbed by this development and the thought of the changes it might bring, one should always bear in mind the classic consideration about any questions of legalization. Often when something is legalized, it facilitates a safer, healthier form of it than that which is already going on anyway.

Extreme restriction usually provokes a reaction of some kind and often those attempts to totally supress certain human inclinations go badly wrong. Prohibition in the ‘20s is a prime example. The American Gaming Association has provided an estimate of the amount of illegal sports betting that already goes on in the USA at present. It comes in at 150 billion dollars’ worth every year.  Now when one considers this, the idea of legalization looks very different. It becomes less a case of opening the floodgates to let something in, and more a case of tidying up an activity that’s already present in abundance.